Presentation at Waseda University

I was honoured to be invited by Kohei Watanabe and Atsushi Tago to give a talk this Wednesday at Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon their request, I was discussing my paper, which is currently under the second round of peer review at the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, from a methodological perspective. Readers of this blog should be familiar with these techniques (for details see the following thread of posts), for which I have already made available the code and the data to encourage future replications. You can find my presentation below, after the page break.

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CONSIL workshop and ‘Experiments in VR’ presentation

Our ESRC project – From coercion to consent: social identity, legitimacy, and a process model of police procedural justice (CONSIL) – had its first workshop this Thursday, on 28th February. It was an excellent opportunity to discuss our research with team members from other universities and to get feedback from officers of various police forces. Jonathan Jackson and I also gave a presentation on the experimental branch of the project and virtual reality (VR) experimentation in particular.

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Testing Complex Social Theories – Replication materials

As reported on Twitter, my paper on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators has been published online:

I have already discussed the theoretical background of multiple mediators in other posts (find them here, here, here, and here). Hence, and as promised, I will instead focus on the code that you need to replicate the results of the paper.

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Christmas reading list

As a Christmas tradition, I usually put together a short list of articles that are not directly relevant to my research but I still find intriguing. (Last year I did not do this because I was focussing on finishing my PhD instead.) Because a couple of people have asked me for this list, I decided to post them here (in alphabetic order).

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Police diversity and #biasinbritain 2.

As a followup to last week’s post, I will discuss how the emerging results of police diversity in the UK compare to trends in the US and why it is important to increase ethnic diversity in the police force.

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Police diversity and #biasinbritain 1.

Thanks to the referral of Ben Bradford, I had the privilege to work with Vikram Dodd from The Guardian who asked me to have a look at some data on police diversity in Britain. Vikram’s excellent piece can be read here, and he mentioned me by name in the article. In this post, I will discuss the analysis I did and how it informed the Bias in Britain project.

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End of a journey… …and start of a new one!

This is the end of my PhD journey: I had my viva voce (for normal human beings: PhD defense)  this Monday and passed without corrections. Hooray!  🙂

I am also fortunate enough to be able to start my new position as a postdoctoral research fellow at the same university and same department right away (this coming Monday). I am sure I will write a lot about the project I am working on in the coming months. This is to the start of my new journey:

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EUROCRIM 2018 presentations

I am still very new to blogging – a couple of people have recently suggested that I should publish my conference presentations on my website, which is so obvious but has never occurred to me earlier. I had the privilege to give two presentations last weekend at EUROCRIM in Sarajevo.

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