Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 4. – Some closing thoughts

After finishing my latest series of posts on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators (you can find them here, here, and here), I had a sinking feeling that I forgot to mention a couple of important points, which means this series is not quite finished yet after all… There are two more issues I want to address: the differences between the post-treatment confounder and sequentially ordered approaches, and a potential Bayesian alternative. Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 4. – Some closing thoughts”

Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 2. – Post-treatment confounding

This is the second installment in a series of posts on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators (see the first one here), which discusses how to handle the case of post-treatment confounding. Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 2. – Post-treatment confounding”

Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 1. – Causal independence and joint mediation

To kick off the year with an “easy” and “light” topic, I decided to start a series of discussions on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators. Because the remaining papers in my PhD rely on such techniques, I thought it might make sense to write a brief summary of the different approaches one can take. I am aware that in a rapidly advancing field such as causal inference this post risks becoming obsolete very quickly, at the same time, I hope that this overview can still remain relevant for some upcoming papers (and posts).  Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 1. – Causal independence and joint mediation”

ScotCET and causal mediation analysis with a single mediator 2. – Issues with the product method and the sequential ignorability assumption

As discussed in this earlier post, to make meaningful inference from the ScotCET dataset, the focus needs to be shifted to the mediated effect. In such cases, following Baron and Kenny’s (1986) influential article, social scientists usually rely on structural equation modelling and the product method to derive the direct and indirect effects. Nevertheless, this approach has serious limitations that are usually overlooked in the applied literature. Continue reading “ScotCET and causal mediation analysis with a single mediator 2. – Issues with the product method and the sequential ignorability assumption”