Scotcet and implementation failure 4. – Treatment effect and design heterogeneity with a demonstration in R

This final post finishes the discussion of the previous three (you can find them here, here, and here) by looking at treatment effect heterogeneity and design heterogeneity.
Continue reading “Scotcet and implementation failure 4. – Treatment effect and design heterogeneity with a demonstration in R”

ScotCET and implementation failure 1. – An apparent implementation failure

As outlined in my earlier post, one of the key propositions in the procedural justice literature is that – at least in most Western countries – procedural justice has an outsized importance in shaping views regarding the police. Yet, there have been only a few studies that established a causal relationship between police practices and the perception of procedural justice (e.g., Lowrey et al., 2016; Sahin et al., 2016), and none, that has explored its mediating role (although see Mazerolle et al. (2013) who used a path analysis approach – more on this in another post). Thus, in my first paper, I decided to “pry open” the black box of causality, and investigate procedural justice’s causally mediating role. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 1. – An apparent implementation failure”

The research agenda of my PhD in a nutshell

The papers in my PhD have been inspired by the theory of procedural justice policing. There is a lively debate on how this theory should be formulated which should be discussed in its own post sometime in the future. For now, let’s state that by-and-large my perspective is aligned with how Tom Tyler and Jonathan Jackson have been postulating the theory (e.g. Jackson and Gau 2015; Tyler and Jackson 2013, 2014). Continue reading “The research agenda of my PhD in a nutshell”