Presentation at the Understanding Society’s Employment Workshop

As a continuation of our project on labour market non-compliance (see my previous post on our report), our research team successfully submitted an affiliated study application to the Understanding Society survey. This means that, subject to funding, we will be allowed to carry out a large-scale representative survey study on precarious workers in the UK with a respondent-driven sampling element as a methodological innovation. I had a chance to present our proposed research at the Understanding Society’s Employment Workshop. The full programme of the event and my presentation are available below.

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Police diversity and #biasinbritain 2.

As a followup to last week’s post, I will discuss how the emerging results of police diversity in the UK compare to trends in the US and why it is important to increase ethnic diversity in the police force.

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Police diversity and #biasinbritain 1.

Thanks to the referral of Ben Bradford, I had the privilege to work with Vikram Dodd from The Guardian who asked me to have a look at some data on police diversity in Britain. Vikram’s excellent piece can be read here, and he mentioned me by name in the article. In this post, I will discuss the analysis I did and how it informed the Bias in Britain project.

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Go Home? – Some thoughts

Teaching the ‘Survey Research Methods: From Design to Analysis’ course at LSE’s Summer School – and my bike being stolen – meant that I’ve been commuting a lot by bus, and had plenty of time to read. In the last couple of days I have been reading “Go Home?”, this short and captivating book. Continue reading “Go Home? – Some thoughts”