Presentation at Waseda University

I was honoured to be invited by Kohei Watanabe and Atsushi Tago to give a talk this Wednesday at Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon their request, I was discussing my paper, which is currently under the second round of peer review at the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, from a methodological perspective. Readers of this blog should be familiar with these techniques (for details see the following thread of posts), for which I have already made available the code and the data to encourage future replications. You can find my presentation below, after the page break.

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CONSIL workshop and ‘Experiments in VR’ presentation

Our ESRC project – From coercion to consent: social identity, legitimacy, and a process model of police procedural justice (CONSIL) – had its first workshop this Thursday, on 28th February. It was an excellent opportunity to discuss our research with team members from other universities and to get feedback from officers of various police forces. Jonathan Jackson and I also gave a presentation on the experimental branch of the project and virtual reality (VR) experimentation in particular.

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Scotcet and implementation failure 4. – Treatment effect and design heterogeneity with a demonstration in R

This final post finishes the discussion of the previous three (you can find them here, here, and here) by looking at treatment effect heterogeneity and design heterogeneity.
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ScotCET and implementation failure 3. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA

This post continues two earlier ones (this one and this one) and assesses the effect consistency across the matched pairs in the ScotCET dataset. Part of the redacted dataset can be downloaded at the bottom of this page which will allow you to carry out the same analysis presented below. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 3. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA”

ScotCET and implementation failure 2. – The design features of ScotCET

How can one evaluate the veracity of the claim made by MacQueen and Bradford (2017), that the treatment effect emerging from the ScotCET RCT is, in fact, attributable to the experimental design, despite the apparent failure of implementation? For this assessment, one needs to discuss some design features of ScotCET. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 2. – The design features of ScotCET”

ScotCET and implementation failure 1. – An apparent implementation failure

As outlined in my earlier post, one of the key propositions in the procedural justice literature is that – at least in most Western countries – procedural justice has an outsized importance in shaping views regarding the police. Yet, there have been only a few studies that established a causal relationship between police practices and the perception of procedural justice (e.g., Lowrey et al., 2016; Sahin et al., 2016), and none, that has explored its mediating role (although see Mazerolle et al. (2013) who used a path analysis approach – more on this in another post). Thus, in my first paper, I decided to “pry open” the black box of causality, and investigate procedural justice’s causally mediating role. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 1. – An apparent implementation failure”