Presentation at Waseda University

I was honoured to be invited by Kohei Watanabe and Atsushi Tago to give a talk this Wednesday at Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon their request, I was discussing my paper, which is currently under the second round of peer review at the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, from a methodological perspective. Readers of this blog should be familiar with these techniques (for details see the following thread of posts), for which I have already made available the code and the data to encourage future replications. You can find my presentation below, after the page break.

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CONSIL workshop and ‘Experiments in VR’ presentation

Our ESRC project – From coercion to consent: social identity, legitimacy, and a process model of police procedural justice (CONSIL) – had its first workshop this Thursday, on 28th February. It was an excellent opportunity to discuss our research with team members from other universities and to get feedback from officers of various police forces. Jonathan Jackson and I also gave a presentation on the experimental branch of the project and virtual reality (VR) experimentation in particular.

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ScotCET and implementation failure 5. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA 2.

I have not been blogging as diligently lately, and one of the reasons for this is that I have been a bit preoccupied with writing resubmissions. As part of this process, I had to revisit the issue of treatment effect consistency which I discussed last summer. This post discusses an alternative way of assessing and quantifying whether treatment effect (in)consistency is present, using methods adopted from meta-analysis.

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A 32-year old White Alabamian man* and the luxury of quantitative criminology

I have been conducting online experiments with MTurk and other similar online platforms for almost four years now. I usually leave a little feedback box at the end of each experiment, where participants can share their thoughts, make some comments, and potential complaints about the study. I have found this a very useful tool, especially during the piloting of the experiments, where many attentive respondents have pointed out several typos and other mistakes over the years. Continue reading “A 32-year old White Alabamian man* and the luxury of quantitative criminology”

Scotcet and implementation failure 4. – Treatment effect and design heterogeneity with a demonstration in R

This final post finishes the discussion of the previous three (you can find them here, here, and here) by looking at treatment effect heterogeneity and design heterogeneity.
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ScotCET and implementation failure 3. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA

This post continues two earlier ones (this one and this one) and assesses the effect consistency across the matched pairs in the ScotCET dataset. Part of the redacted dataset can be downloaded at the bottom of this page which will allow you to carry out the same analysis presented below. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 3. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA”

ScotCET and implementation failure 2. – The design features of ScotCET

How can one evaluate the veracity of the claim made by MacQueen and Bradford (2017), that the treatment effect emerging from the ScotCET RCT is, in fact, attributable to the experimental design, despite the apparent failure of implementation? For this assessment, one needs to discuss some design features of ScotCET. Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 2. – The design features of ScotCET”