Quantitative Methods Reading Group – End of the first year!

As mentioned in an earlier post, I have had the privilege to be one of the founders and first organiser of LSE’s Quantitative Methods Reading Group. The Reading Group’s first academic year has just concluded, and with twelve fascinating articles and discussions under its belt, it goes on a well-deserved summer vacation. I collated all the literature chosen throughout the year, it is worth a browse:

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ScotCET and implementation failure 5. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA 2.

I have not been blogging as diligently lately, and one of the reasons for this is that I have been a bit preoccupied with writing resubmissions. As part of this process, I had to revisit the issue of treatment effect consistency which I discussed last summer. This post discusses an alternative way of assessing and quantifying whether treatment effect (in)consistency is present, using methods adopted from meta-analysis.

Continue reading “ScotCET and implementation failure 5. – Treatment effect consistency in a blocking design with a demonstration in STATA 2.”

MY457 – Some further readings on causal inference

During Lent term, I have been one of the GTAs (i.e., Graduate Teaching Assistants) for MY457, or Causal Inference in Experimental and Observational Studies. As wonderfully inquisitive LSE students are, they have been asking me for further readings on the methods we have been discussing throughout the course. I thought that it might make sense to list some recurring suggestions I have made to them, if for nothing else, for a quick reference to anyone taking the course (or otherwise interested in the topics covered by it).

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Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 4. – Some closing thoughts

After finishing my latest series of posts on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators (you can find them here, here, and here), I had a sinking feeling that I forgot to mention a couple of important points, which means this series is not quite finished yet after all… There are two more issues I want to address: the differences between the post-treatment confounder and sequentially ordered approaches, and a potential Bayesian alternative. Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 4. – Some closing thoughts”

Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 3. – Sequentially ordered mediators

In this third, and final post on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators (see the first two here and here), I discuss the case of sequentially ordered mediators.  Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 3. – Sequentially ordered mediators”

Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 2. – Post-treatment confounding

This is the second installment in a series of posts on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators (see the first one here), which discusses how to handle the case of post-treatment confounding. Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 2. – Post-treatment confounding”

Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 1. – Causal independence and joint mediation

To kick off the year with an “easy” and “light” topic, I decided to start a series of discussions on causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators. Because the remaining papers in my PhD rely on such techniques, I thought it might make sense to write a brief summary of the different approaches one can take. I am aware that in a rapidly advancing field such as causal inference this post risks becoming obsolete very quickly, at the same time, I hope that this overview can still remain relevant for some upcoming papers (and posts).  Continue reading “Causal mediation analysis with multiple mediators 1. – Causal independence and joint mediation”

A 32-year old White Alabamian man* and the luxury of quantitative criminology

I have been conducting online experiments with MTurk and other similar online platforms for almost four years now. I usually leave a little feedback box at the end of each experiment, where participants can share their thoughts, make some comments, and potential complaints about the study. I have found this a very useful tool, especially during the piloting of the experiments, where many attentive respondents have pointed out several typos and other mistakes over the years. Continue reading “A 32-year old White Alabamian man* and the luxury of quantitative criminology”

OSF account

This is another post with a news item: I have recently registered to the Open Science Foundation’s website where I have already uploaded two papers of mine (more to come in due time). My supervisor, Jon Jackson has encouraged me to do this, which I am really grateful for. It is great to have your articles accessible somewhere whilst you are waiting for the painstakingly slow review process to hopefully bear some fruit…

You can find my public profile here.